News from the Department of Archaeology

A systematic study of dental calculus from the Iron Age to the present proves the potential of proteomic analysis to reveal information about individual diets, including plants, animals and dairy products consumption.

Potential of protein analysis to retrieve dietary information from ancient dental calculus revealed by new study

A systematic study of dental calculus from the Iron Age to the present proves the potential of proteomic analysis to reveal information about individual diets, including plants, animals and dairy products consumption.

[more]
Humans did not stem from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa, as is often claimed. Instead, our African ancestors were diverse in form and culture, and scattered across the entire continent.

Our fractured African roots

Humans did not stem from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa, as is often claimed. Instead, our African ancestors were diverse in form and culture, and scattered across the entire continent.

[more]
Patrick Roberts is a co-lead investigator of the joint UK German project LOMVIA. Together with Norman Ratcliffe he uses biochemical and ecological studies of indigenous and invasive Arctic seabirds to study the local impacts of climate change and resource stress on species composition and competition in this increasingly changeable environment.

New funding initiative enables researchers from Germany and the United Kingdom join forces to study the impacts of climate change and resource stress on Arctic ecosystems

Patrick Roberts is a co-lead investigator of the joint UK German project LOMVIA. Together with Norman Ratcliffe he uses biochemical and ecological studies of indigenous and invasive Arctic seabirds to study the local impacts of climate change and resource stress on species composition and competition in this increasingly changeable environment. [more]
New research reveals that the practice of veterinary dentistry was innovated on the open steppes of Mongolia and eastern Eurasia – and dates back more than 3000 years.

Oldest evidence of horse veterinary care discovered in Mongolia

New research reveals that the practice of veterinary dentistry was innovated on the open steppes of Mongolia and eastern Eurasia – and dates back more than 3000 years.

[more]
Differences in carbon and nitrogen isotope values between ancient livestock indicate that horses were grazed extensively, while ruminants were grazed intensively.

Evidence for variation in ancient livestock pasturing strategies in the Kazakh steppe

Differences in carbon and nitrogen isotope values between ancient livestock indicate that horses were grazed extensively, while ruminants were grazed intensively. [more]
The Federal Foreign Office's Foreign Service Academy brings together young diplomats from around the world in its 9th International Diplomat Programme. The aim of this training initiative is to perceive foreign policy as an opportunity for cooperation and as a basis upon which to build the foundation for a working partnership on global matters. The programme offers a broad selection of seminars, informative visits and study tours, such as a visit at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

Visit of young international diplomats on June 6th

The Federal Foreign Office's Foreign Service Academy brings together young diplomats from around the world in its 9th International Diplomat Programme. The aim of this training initiative is to perceive foreign policy as an opportunity for cooperation and as a basis upon which to build the foundation for a working partnership on global matters. The programme offers a broad selection of seminars, informative visits and study tours, such as a visit at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. [more]
Heirloom Microbes Project WorkshopDate: June 17-20, 2018Room: Villa V03Host: Heirloom Microbes Project

Microbial Diversity of Traditional Dairy Ecologies

Heirloom Microbes Project Workshop
Date: June 17-20, 2018
Room: Villa V03
Host: Heirloom Microbes Project [more]
A group of pre-school children from the Dualingo Kindergarten visited the MPI for the Science of Human History at the beginning of June. Jana Zech and her colleagues have explained to the children how and what archaeologists research. Picture: skull models of various primitive human beings called Hominins.

Archaeology for Kindergarten kids

A group of pre-school children from the Dualingo Kindergarten visited the MPI for the Science of Human History at the beginning of June. Jana Zech and her colleagues have explained to the children how and what archaeologists research. Picture: skull models of various primitive human beings called Hominins.
Rats were carried on ships as humans settled the remote islands of the Pacific - analysis of the rats’ remains reveals changes humans made to the island ecosystems.

Pacific rats trace 2000 years of human impact on island ecosystems

Rats were carried on ships as humans settled the remote islands of the Pacific - analysis of the rats’ remains reveals changes humans made to the island ecosystems. [more]
Verónica Zuccarelli presented data from her DAAD-funded research stay at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History to the VIIth Argentinian Congress on Archaeometrics, 17-20 April 2018.

DAAD-funded project presented at the 7th Argentinian Congress on Archaeometrics

Verónica Zuccarelli presented data from her DAAD-funded research stay at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History to the VIIth Argentinian Congress on Archaeometrics, 17-20 April 2018. [more]
The president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, Prince Sultan bin Salman, announced the find, made by Michael Petraglia, Huw Groucutt and colleagues.

Human footprints found in northwestern Saudi Arabia near the city of Tabuk could be more than 85,000 years old

The president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, Prince Sultan bin Salman, announced the find, made by Michael Petraglia, Huw Groucutt and colleagues. [more]
The first substantial cave record from coastal Kenya ranges from the Middle Stone Age to the Iron Age, showing gradual changes in cultural, technological and symbolic innovations beginning at 67,000 years ago.

78,000 year cave record from East Africa shows early cultural innovations

The first substantial cave record from coastal Kenya ranges from the Middle Stone Age to the Iron Age, showing gradual changes in cultural, technological and symbolic innovations beginning at 67,000 years ago. [more]
An international team of researchers has discovered the oldest evidence for the peopling of the Philippines by hominins. Their findings at the archaeological site of Kalinga (Rizal Municipality, Kalinga Province, Luzon Island) were dated to 709,000 years old.

Humans were present in the Philippine islands as early as 700,000 years ago

An international team of researchers has discovered the oldest evidence for the peopling of the Philippines by hominins. Their findings at the archaeological site of Kalinga (Rizal Municipality, Kalinga Province, Luzon Island) were dated to 709,000 years old. [more]
Congratulations to Patrick Roberts from the Department of Archaology for winning the Beutenberg-Campus Jena e.V's award for outstanding achievement by a young researcher. Patricks work has uncovered new insights into the relationship between humans and tropical forests in the past.

Patrick Roberts wins Beutenberg Campus award

Congratulations to Patrick Roberts from the Department of Archaology for winning the Beutenberg-Campus Jena e.V's award for outstanding achievement by a young researcher. Patricks work has uncovered new insights into the relationship between humans and tropical forests in the past.
The first Homo sapiens fossil discovery from Saudi Arabia dates to 90,000 years ago during a time when the region’s deserts were replaced by grasslands.

First human migration out of Africa much more geographically widespread than previously thought

The first Homo sapiens fossil discovery from Saudi Arabia dates to 90,000 years ago during a time when the region’s deserts were replaced by grasslands.

[more]
Date & Time: April 5, 2018, 9:00 - 18:00 Room: Villa V14 Hosts: Alision Crowther, Department of Archaeology

the Future of the PAST - New archaeological science approaches to cultural interaction and biological exchange in Prehistory

Date & Time: April 5, 2018, 9:00 - 18:00
Room: Villa V14
Hosts: Alision Crowther, Department of Archaeology [more]
The new field of palaeoproteomics, harnessing cutting-edge techniques to analyze ancient proteins, is growing quickly. Researchers set out standards and precautions that aim to provide it with a firm foundation.

New standards for ancient protein studies set forth by multi-national group of researchers

The new field of palaeoproteomics, harnessing cutting-edge techniques to analyze ancient proteins, is growing quickly. Researchers set out standards and precautions that aim to provide it with a firm foundation. [more]
Prof. Petraglia’s talk at Wolfson College, University of Cambridge “Following in Bridget Allchin’s Footsteps: the Current State of Stone Age Archaeology” reflected on Dr. Allchin’s pioneering work and contributions to the field throughout her career.

Prof. Michael Petraglia speaks at University of Cambridge memorial event for Dr. Bridget Allchin, a pioneer in the field of South Asian archaeology

Prof. Petraglia’s talk at Wolfson College, University of Cambridge “Following in Bridget Allchin’s Footsteps: the Current State of Stone Age Archaeology” reflected on Dr. Allchin’s pioneering work and contributions to the field throughout her career. [more]
Participants from around the world will attend to learn about the latest cutting-edge techniques in archaeological science.

Department of Archaeology hosts a weeklong workshop on “International Applications of Archaeological Science”

Participants from around the world will attend to learn about the latest cutting-edge techniques in archaeological science. [more]
This month we will be highlighting female employees and their work, beginning with Director Nicole Boivin of the Department of Archaeology. Check back here throughout the month for updates!

International Women's Day 2018 at the MPI-SHH

This month we will be highlighting female employees and their work, beginning with Director Nicole Boivin of the Department of Archaeology. Check back here throughout the month for updates! [more]
Speaker: Dr. María Martinón-Torres, Director, Centro National Research Center on Human Evolution (CENIEH), Burgos, SpainDate & Time: March 14, 2018, 15:30Room: Villa V14Hosts: Michael Petraglia and Nicole Boivin, Department of Archaeology

Distinguished Lecture by Dr. María Martinón-Torres - "The Evolution of Homo sapiens: Asian Perspectives"

Speaker: Dr. María Martinón-Torres, Director, Centro National Research Center on Human Evolution (CENIEH), Burgos, Spain
Date & Time: March 14, 2018, 15:30
Room: Villa V14
Hosts: Michael Petraglia and Nicole Boivin, Department of Archaeology [more]
The Max Planck Institutes for the Science of Human History, Biogeochemistry and Chemical Ecology invite applications for a Max Planck Research Group Leader (W2) position on the topic of extreme events in biological, societal and Earth systems.

Joint MPI Job Offer: Research Group Leader (W2) - Extreme events in biological, societal and Earth systems

The Max Planck Institutes for the Science of Human History, Biogeochemistry and Chemical Ecology invite applications for a Max Planck Research Group Leader (W2) position on the topic of extreme events in biological, societal and Earth systems. [more]
Stable isotope research group of the MPI-SHH provides recommendations on terminology, methodology, data handling, and reporting when developing and reviewing stable isotope applications in archaeology.

"Calling all archaeologists"

Stable isotope research group of the MPI-SHH provides recommendations on terminology, methodology, data handling, and reporting when developing and reviewing stable isotope applications in archaeology. [more]
Mr. Rajachandran Madhan and researchers discussed ongoing projects in India and possibilities for future collaborations.

Visit from the Counsellor for Science & Technology of the Indian Embassy in Germany

Mr. Rajachandran Madhan and researchers discussed ongoing projects in India and possibilities for future collaborations. [more]
Dr. Yang, whose research areas include Paleolithic East Asia, lithic techniques and raw material sourcing, is a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Shixia Yang granted a Humboldt Research Fellowship to conduct research at the Institute

Dr. Yang, whose research areas include Paleolithic East Asia, lithic techniques and raw material sourcing, is a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. [more]
 
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