Dog studies

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are done in a playful way.

Participants wanted!

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are done in a playful way. [more]

Latest publications

Lai, Y.: The polysemous lia̍h 力 in Early Modern Southern Min and its contemporary fate. Journal of Chinese Linguistics 47 (1), pp. 193 - 226 (2019)
Roberts, P.; Amano, N.: Plastic pioneers: Hominin biogeography east of the Movius Line during the Pleistocene. Archaeological Research in Asia (2019)
Radini, A.; Tromp, M.; Beach, A. I.; Tong, E.; Speller, C.; McCormick, M.; Dudgeon, J. V.; Collins, M. J.; Rühli, F.; Kröger, R. et al.; Warinner, C. G.: Medieval women’s early involvement in manuscript production suggested by lapis lazuli identification in dental calculus. Science Advances (2019)
Jelbert, S. A.; Miller, R.; Schiestl, M.; Boeckle, M.; Cheke, L. G.; Gray, R. D.; Taylor, A. H.; Clayton, N. S.: New Caledonian crows infer the weight of objects from observing their movements in a breeze. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 286 (1894), 20182332 (2019)
David-Chavez, D. M.; Gavin, M. C.: A global assessment of Indigenous community engagement in climate research. Environmental Research Letters 13 (12), 123005 (2018)
Seifart, F.; Evans, N.; Hammarström, H.; Levinson, S. C.: Language documentation twenty-five years on. Language (2018)
Scerri, E. M. L.; Shipton, C.; Clark-Balzan, L.; Frouin, M.; Schwenninger, J.-L.; Groucutt, H. S.; Breeze, P. S.; Parton, A.; Blinkhorn, J.; Drake, N. A. et al.; Jennings, R.; Cuthbertson, P.; Omari, A. A.; Alsharekh, A. M.; Petraglia, M. D.: The expansion of later Acheulean hominins into the Arabian Peninsula. Scientific Reports (2018)
Lamnidis, T. C.; Majander, K.; Jeong, C.; Salmela, E.; Wessman, A.; Moiseyev, V.; Khartanovich, V.; Balanovsky, O.; Ongyerth, M.; Weihmann, A. et al.; Sajantila, A.; Kelso, J.; Pääbo, S.; Onkamo, P.; Haak, W.; Krause, J.; Schiffels, S.: Ancient Fennoscandian genomes reveal origin and spread of Siberian ancestry in Europe. Nature Communications (2018)
Oliveira, S.; Hübner, A.; Fehn, A.-M.; Aço, T.; Lages, F.; Pakendorf, B.; Stoneking, M.; Rocha, J.: The role of matrilineality in shaping patterns of Y chromosome and mtDNA sequence variation in southwestern Angola. European Journal of Human Genetics (2018)
Bos, K. I.: TB’s Chinese travels. Nature Ecology & Evolution (2018)

A complete list of publications you can find here.

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Institute Profile

The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) in Jena was founded in 2014 to target fundamental questions of human history and evolution since the Paleolithic. From the vantage point of three interdisciplinary research departments – the Department of Archaeogenetics (Director Johannes Krause), the Department of Archaeology (Director Nicole Boivin), and the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution (Director Russell Gray) – the MPI-SHH pursues an integrative approach to the study of human history that bridges the traditional divide between the natural sciences and the humanities. [more]


News

Students have the opportunity to discover the science of human history through exciting hands-on experiments.Date: March 28th, 2019Time: 9:00-13:00Host: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Forsche Schüler Day 2019

Students have the opportunity to discover the science of human history through exciting hands-on experiments.
Date: March 28th, 2019
Time: 9:00-13:00
Host: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History [more]
Date & Time: 27 February 2019, 3pmSpeaker: Sabine ReinholdRoom: Villa V14Host: Department of Archeology

Distinguished Lecture by Sabine Reinhold: "Bridging Eurasia and the Near East - Recent developments in the archaeology of the Caucasus"

Date & Time: 27 February 2019, 3pm
Speaker: Sabine Reinhold
Room: Villa V14
Host: Department of Archeology [more]
Participants from around the world will attend to learn about the latest cutting-edge techniques in archaeological science.Date: 20-31 March 2019Host: Department of Archaeology

International Applications of Archaeological Sciences 2019

Participants from around the world will attend to learn about the latest cutting-edge techniques in archaeological science.
Date: 20-31 March 2019
Host: Department of Archaeology

[more]
Prof. Dr. habil. Martine Robbeets has been awarded an honorary professorship at the University of Mainz. She will give her Inaugural Lecture titled "Building on Mainzer traditions in Transeurasian linguistics" on 15 February 2019. Congratulations!

Honorary Professorship at the University of Mainz awarded to Prof. Dr. habil. Martine Robbeets

Prof. Dr. habil. Martine Robbeets has been awarded an honorary professorship at the University of Mainz. She will give her Inaugural Lecture titled "Building on Mainzer traditions in Transeurasian linguistics" on 15 February 2019. Congratulations!
The joint project, which includes MPI-SHH researchers William Taylor and Nils Vanwezer, explores Mongolia’s earliest prehistory, from the Paleolithic through the first pastoral peoples of the Bronze Age.

"Mongolian-American Joint Northern Mongolian Archaeology Project" wins Research Project of the Year at the Mongolian Archaeology Conference 2018

The joint project, which includes MPI-SHH researchers William Taylor and Nils Vanwezer, explores Mongolia’s earliest prehistory, from the Paleolithic through the first pastoral peoples of the Bronze Age. [more]
In a new video from Latest Thinking, Michael Petraglia describes his research, which includes the use of satellite imagery to identify ancient rivers and lakes in present-day desert regions, and demonstrates that modern humans emerged from Africa much earlier than previously thought.

"What New Insights Can Archeology Provide Into Homo sapiens’ Emergence from Africa?"

In a new video from Latest Thinking, Michael Petraglia describes his research, which includes the use of satellite imagery to identify ancient rivers and lakes in present-day desert regions, and demonstrates that modern humans emerged from Africa much earlier than previously thought. [more]
Date: 18-20 February 2019Location: Haus der Kulturen der Welt, BerlinOrganized by the Department of Archaeology

DA Workshop: Global Markers of the Anthropocene

Date: 18-20 February 2019
Location: Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin
Organized by the Department of Archaeology

[more]
For a long time the tropical forest has been assumed to represent an environment inhospitable to humans. In a new video by Latest Thinking Patrick Roberts explains why he challenges this view.

What Can We Learn from Studying Homo sapiens’ First Moves into Tropical Forests?

For a long time the tropical forest has been assumed to represent an environment inhospitable to humans. In a new video by Latest Thinking Patrick Roberts explains why he challenges this view. [more]
Genetic studies of ancient populations in the Caucasus region testify to the complex interaction of populations from the Eurasian steppe and the Caucasus Mountains in the Bronze Age.

The Caucasus: complex interplay of genes and cultures

Genetic studies of ancient populations in the Caucasus region testify to the complex interaction of populations from the Eurasian steppe and the Caucasus Mountains in the Bronze Age. [more]
More than 150 new dates provide the first robust chronology for Denisova Cave, the only site in the world known to have been occupied by both Neanderthals, Denisovans, and later by modern humans.

New studies reveal deep history of Denisovans and Neanderthals in southern Siberia

More than 150 new dates provide the first robust chronology for Denisova Cave, the only site in the world known to have been occupied by both Neanderthals, Denisovans, and later by modern humans. [more]
Date & Time: February 6, 2019, 16:00Speaker: Prof. Dr. Katerina Harvati-PapatheodorouRoom: Villa V14Host: Department of Archaeology

Distinguished Lecture by Katerina Harvati-Papatheodorou: "Neanderthals and early modern humans: New results from the lab and field"

Date & Time: February 6, 2019, 16:00
Speaker: Prof. Dr. Katerina Harvati-Papatheodorou
Room: Villa V14
Host: Department of Archaeology [more]
New review compares the regional adaptations of humans and those of other hominin species to add support to the argument that our species is ecologically unique.

Humans colonized diverse environments in Southeast Asia and Oceania during the Pleistocene

New review compares the regional adaptations of humans and those of other hominin species to add support to the argument that our species is ecologically unique. [more]
The Honorary Professorships were awarded in the School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, Australia, with which the Department of Archaeology already enjoys close collaborative relationships.

Professorships at The University of Queensland Awarded to Nicole Boivin and Michael Petraglia

The Honorary Professorships were awarded in the School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, Australia, with which the Department of Archaeology already enjoys close collaborative relationships. [more]
This new text is the first to bring together evidence for the nature of human interactions with tropical forests on a global scale, from the emergence of hominins in the tropical forests of Africa to modern conservation issues.

New book "Tropical Forests in Prehistory, History, and Modernity" reveals long-term human use and habitation of critically endangered habitats

This new text is the first to bring together evidence for the nature of human interactions with tropical forests on a global scale, from the emergence of hominins in the tropical forests of Africa to modern conservation issues. [more]
Analysis of the fossilized dental plaque of a medieval woman reveals lapis lazuli, suggesting she was an accomplished painter of illuminated manuscripts.

Illuminating women’s role in the creation of medieval manuscripts

Analysis of the fossilized dental plaque of a medieval woman reveals lapis lazuli, suggesting she was an accomplished painter of illuminated manuscripts. [more]
The group, which began in September 2018, will investigate the Eastern Roman Empire, known as Byzantium, and the ways in which its population responded to environmental changes.

New Max Planck Independent Research Group “Byzantine Resilience: Environmental History of the Eastern Romans (ByzRes)” headed by Dr. Adam Izdebski

The group, which began in September 2018, will investigate the Eastern Roman Empire, known as Byzantium, and the ways in which its population responded to environmental changes. [more]
In December 2018, Corentin Bochaton was awarded the second-annual Roger Heim Prize by the Society of Friends of the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, France.

Corentin Bochaton awarded the Roger Heim Prize

In December 2018, Corentin Bochaton was awarded the second-annual Roger Heim Prize by the Society of Friends of the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, France. [more]
From 2019, the Pan-African Evolution Research Group will explore human evolution and demography across Africa through a combination of archaeology, genetics, biogeography and climate science. The group is headed by Dr Eleanor Scerri.

‘Lise Meitner’ Pan-African Evolution Research Group (Pan-Ev)

From 2019, the Pan-African Evolution Research Group will explore human evolution and demography across Africa through a combination of archaeology, genetics, biogeography and climate science. The group is headed by Dr Eleanor Scerri. [more]
Registration now open here!Mar. 31 - Apr. 4, 2019Location: EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyCo-Organizer: Johannes Krause

Reconstructing the Human Past - EMBO|EMBL Symposium

Registration now open here!
Mar. 31 - Apr. 4, 2019
Location: EMBL Heidelberg, Germany
Co-Organizer: Johannes Krause [more]
Stone handaxes, similar to those made by early humans as much as 1.5 million years ago, have been dated for the first time in the Arabian Peninsula, to less than 190,000 years old, where their production may have endured until the arrival of Homo sapiens.

Stone tools linked to ancient human ancestors found in Arabia with a surprisingly recent date

Stone handaxes, similar to those made by early humans as much as 1.5 million years ago, have been dated for the first time in the Arabian Peninsula, to less than 190,000 years old, where their production may have endured until the arrival of Homo sapiens. [more]
New study shows that the genetic makeup of northern Europe traces back to migrations from Siberia that began at least 3,500 years ago and that, as recently as the Iron Age, ancestors of the Saami lived in a larger area of Finland than today.

First ancient DNA ever analyzed from mainland Finland reveals origin of Siberian ancestry in Saami and Finnish populations

New study shows that the genetic makeup of northern Europe traces back to migrations from Siberia that began at least 3,500 years ago and that, as recently as the Iron Age, ancestors of the Saami lived in a larger area of Finland than today. [more]
The project “Horses and Human Societies in New World Australia” will explore the impact that horses have had on the people and environments of Australia since their introduction.

Taylor and colleagues win DAAD research award to study the early history of horses in Australia

The project “Horses and Human Societies in New World Australia” will explore the impact that horses have had on the people and environments of Australia since their introduction. [more]
When they don’t have enough information to make an accurate decision, dogs will search for more – similarly to chimpanzees and humans.

Dogs know when they don’t know

When they don’t have enough information to make an accurate decision, dogs will search for more – similarly to chimpanzees and humans. [more]
An international team of researchers has revealed unexpected details about the peopling of Central and South America in an ancient DNA study.

Ancient DNA evidence for two previously unknown genetic exchanges between North and South America

An international team of researchers has revealed unexpected details about the peopling of Central and South America in an ancient DNA study. [more]
Analysis of seven ancient whole genomes reveals adaptations to the high-altitude environment and agrarian lifestyle of the Andes.

History of early settlement and survival in the Andean highlands revealed by ancient genomes

Analysis of seven ancient whole genomes reveals adaptations to the high-altitude environment and agrarian lifestyle of the Andes. [more]
Dairying of cattle, sheep, and goats was established in northern Mongolia by 1300 BC – despite limited genetic interactions with Western Steppe herders.

Oldest evidence of dairying on the East Asian Steppe

Dairying of cattle, sheep, and goats was established in northern Mongolia by 1300 BC – despite limited genetic interactions with Western Steppe herders. [more]
 
loading content
Go to Editor View