Dog studies

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are done in a playful way.

Participants wanted!

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are done in a playful way. [more]

Latest publications

Översti, S.; Majander, K.; Salmela, E.; Salo, K.; Arppe, L.; Belskiy, S.; Etu-Sihvola, H.; Laakso, V.; Mikkola, E.; Pfrengle, S. et al.; Putkonen, M.; Taavitsainen, J.-P.; Vuoristo, K.; Wessman, A.; Sajantila, A.; Oinonen, M.; Haak, W.; Schuenemann, V. J.; Krause, J.; Palo, J. U.; Onkamo, P.: Human mitochondrial DNA lineages in Iron-Age Fennoscandia suggest incipient admixture and eastern introduction of farming-related maternal ancestry. Scientific Reports 9 (1) (2019)
Lebrato, M.; Wang, Y.; Tseng, L.-C.; Achterberg, E. P.; Chen, X.-G.; Molinero, J.-C.; Bremer, K.; Westernströer, U.; Söding, E.; Dahms, H.-U. et al.; Küter, M.; Heinath, V.; Jöhnck, J.; Konstantinou, K. I.; Yang, Y. J.; Hwang, J.-S.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.: Earthquake and typhoon trigger unprecedented transient shifts in shallow hydrothermal vents biogeochemistry. Scientific Reports 9 (1) (2019)
Amici, F.; Waterman, J.; Kellermann, C. M.; Karimullah, K.; Bräuer, J.: The ability to recognize dog emotions depends on the cultural milieu in which we grow up. Scientific Reports 9 (1), 16414 (2019)
Hanot, P.: Peter Mitchell. The Donkey in Human History: An Archaeological Perspective (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 306 pp., 133 illustr., 32 in colour, 6 tables, hbk, ISBN 978-0-19-874923-3). European Journal of Archaeology 22 (4), pp. 595 - 598 (2019)
Arrieta-Bolaños, E.; Oliveira, D. C.; Barquera, R.: Differential admixture, human leukocyte antigen diversity, and hematopoietic cell transplantation in Latin America: challenges and opportunities. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2019)
Taylor, W.; Wilkin, S.; Wright, J.; Dee, M.; Erdene, M.; Clark, J.; Tuvshinjargal, T.; Bayarsaikhan, J.; Fitzhugh, W.; Boivin, N.: Radiocarbon dating and cultural dynamics across Mongolia’s early pastoral transition. PLoS One 14 (11) (2019)
Childebayeva, A.; Harman, T.; Weinstein, J.; Goodrich, J. M.; Dolinoy, D. C.; Day, T. A.; Bigham, A. W.; Brutsaert, T. D.: Dna methylation changes are associated with an incremental ascent to high altitude. Frontiers in Genetics 10 (OCT) (2019)
Rest, M.; Rippa, A.: Road animism: reflections on the life of infrastructures. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 9 (2) (2019)
Hoover, K. C.; Hudson, M.: Hunter-gatherer adaptation and resilience: a bioarchaeological perspective / Daniel H. Temple and Christopher M. Stojanowski. - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. - ISBN 9781107187351. $99.99 (Hardcover). American Journal of Physical Anthropology (2019)
Sawchuk, E. A.; Pfeiffer, S.; Klehm, C. E.; Cameron, M. E.; Hill, A. C.; Janzen, A.; Grillo, K. M.; Hildebrand, E. A.: The bioarchaeology of mid-Holocene pastoralist cemeteries west of Lake Turkana, Kenya. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences (2019)

A complete list of publications you can find here.

Events calendar

December 2019
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1
2 3 4 5
Cross-Departmental Work-in-Progress Seminar

from 13:00 to 14:00

6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Institute Profile

The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) in Jena was founded in 2014 to target fundamental questions of human history and evolution since the Paleolithic. From the vantage point of three interdisciplinary research departments – the Department of Archaeogenetics (Director Johannes Krause), the Department of Archaeology (Director Nicole Boivin), and the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution (Director Russell Gray) – the MPI-SHH pursues an integrative approach to the study of human history that bridges the traditional divide between the natural sciences and the humanities. [more]


News

The 23-chapter volume edited by Dr. Stuart Bedford is available now for purchase or free download. Read about the archaeology of Lapita, a cultural horizon associated with the founding populations who first colonised much of the southwest Pacific some 3000 years ago.

Now available: Debating Lapita - Distribution, Chronology, Society and Subsistence

The 23-chapter volume edited by Dr. Stuart Bedford is available now for purchase or free download. Read about the archaeology of Lapita, a cultural horizon associated with the founding populations who first colonised much of the southwest Pacific some 3000 years ago. [more]
Among the Top 10 Discoveries of 2019, two came from scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Read about how Robert Spengler’s research On the Origin of Apples and Christina Warinner’s discovery of a Medieval Female Scribe changed our understanding of human history this year.

ARCHAEOLOGY magazine credits MPI SHH scientists with two of Top 10 Discoveries of 2019

Among the Top 10 Discoveries of 2019, two came from scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. Read about how Robert Spengler’s research On the Origin of Apples and Christina Warinner’s discovery of a Medieval Female Scribe changed our understanding of human history this year. [more]
Dr. Stephan Schiffels and Joscha Gretzinger use genetic analysis to help restore dignity to unethically obtained skeletons in South Africa

Addressing injustice with the science of human history

Dr. Stephan Schiffels and Joscha Gretzinger use genetic analysis to help restore dignity to unethically obtained skeletons in South Africa [more]
A study of diverse datasets, including pollen, coinage, and funeral practices, reveals that the effects of the late antique plague pandemic commonly known as the Justinianic Plague may have been overestimated.

Justinianic Plague not a Landmark Pandemic?

A study of diverse datasets, including pollen, coinage, and funeral practices, reveals that the effects of the late antique plague pandemic commonly known as the Justinianic Plague may have been overestimated. [more]
New archeological analysis challenges long-standing hypotheses about ostrich eggshell beads and the spread of pastoralism in Africa

Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa

New archeological analysis challenges long-standing hypotheses about ostrich eggshell beads and the spread of pastoralism in Africa [more]
"The dead are very important in Wanniyalaeto society," said Chief Wanniya Uruwarige. "This reuniting of spirits and physical remains... is a very special moment for my people."

Repatriation of Wanniyalaeto (‘Veddah’) remains following ceremony in Edinburgh

"The dead are very important in Wanniyalaeto society," said Chief Wanniya Uruwarige. "This reuniting of spirits and physical remains... is a very special moment for my people." [more]
Results of horseback surveys of ice patches in northern Mongolia provide the first archaeological insights from the region, revealing fragile organic artifacts previously buried in ice

Mongolia’s melting ice reveals clues to history of reindeer herding, threatens way of life

Results of horseback surveys of ice patches in northern Mongolia provide the first archaeological insights from the region, revealing fragile organic artifacts previously buried in ice

[more]
New study published in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology further encourages a focus on diverse African environments, rather than simply marine or savannah settings, when studying the evolution and dispersal of Homo sapiens.

New palaeoecological record from the tropical environments of coastal eastern Africa provides insights into early human adaptations

New study published in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology further encourages a focus on diverse African environments, rather than simply marine or savannah settings, when studying the evolution and dispersal of Homo sapiens. [more]
Dr. Natalie Uomini of the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution offers evolutionary perspectives on handedness to Live Science

Why Are People Left- (or Right-) Handed?

Dr. Natalie Uomini of the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution offers evolutionary perspectives on handedness to Live Science

[more]
"The 39-year-old's laboratory specializes in the analysis of ancient DNA, thus combining the disciplines of archaeology and genetics. It is one of a handful of institutions worldwide that regularly produce spectacular research results on human history."

Lord of the Bones – Johannes Krause profiled in Spiegel Online (German Language)

"The 39-year-old's laboratory specializes in the analysis of ancient DNA, thus combining the disciplines of archaeology and genetics. It is one of a handful of institutions worldwide that regularly produce spectacular research results on human history."

[more]
The first comprehensive study of the human ability to recognize the facial expressions of dogs suggests this ability is mainly acquired through age and experience and is not an evolutionarily selected trait, and in adults is better in those growing up in dog-positive cultural contexts.

Humans’ ability to read dogs’ facial expressions is learned, not innate

The first comprehensive study of the human ability to recognize the facial expressions of dogs suggests this ability is mainly acquired through age and experience and is not an evolutionarily selected trait, and in adults is better in those growing up in dog-positive cultural contexts.

[more]
The Paleo-Science & History Group received major DFG funding (€395k for three years, together with the Byzantinistik at the FU Berlin) from the “Beethoven” Program, which provides funding for integrated Polish-German research projects. On the German side, the project leaders are Prof. Johannes Niehoff-Panagiotidis from the Freie Universität Berlin and Dr. Adam Izdebski from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena.

New DFG funding awarded to the Paleo-Science & History Group: the SCALoFRAG Project

The Paleo-Science & History Group received major DFG funding (€395k for three years, together with the Byzantinistik at the FU Berlin) from the “Beethoven” Program, which provides funding for integrated Polish-German research projects. On the German side, the project leaders are Prof. Johannes Niehoff-Panagiotidis from the Freie Universität Berlin and Dr. Adam Izdebski from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena. [more]
The Department of Archaeogenetics supported the Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Archäologie in Herne with the conception and realization of a large new special exhibition on the history of the plague and its worldwide effects.

Special exhibition "Pest!" at the LWL-Museum für Archäologie Herne

The Department of Archaeogenetics supported the Westfälisches Landesmuseum für Archäologie in Herne with the conception and realization of a large new special exhibition on the history of the plague and its worldwide effects.

[more]
The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History’s Johannes Krause among four principal investigators to head HistoGenes - a project integrating genetic, archaeological and historical perspectives on Eastern Central Europe, 400-900 AD.

10 million Euro ERC Synergy Grant awarded for study of medieval populations

The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History’s Johannes Krause among four principal investigators to head HistoGenes - a project integrating genetic, archaeological and historical perspectives on Eastern Central Europe, 400-900 AD. [more]
Archaeogenetic analyses provide new insights into social inequality 4000 years ago: nuclear families lived together with foreign women and individuals from lower social classes in the same household.

Social inequality in Bronze Age households

Archaeogenetic analyses provide new insights into social inequality 4000 years ago: nuclear families lived together with foreign women and individuals from lower social classes in the same household. [more]
New study indicates Middle Palaeolithic people lived near the Indian Ocean coastline over 100,000 years ago, but shared common behaviours with inland populations.

The first directly dated evidence for Palaeolithic occupation on the Indian coast at Sandhav, Kachchh

New study indicates Middle Palaeolithic people lived near the Indian Ocean coastline over 100,000 years ago, but shared common behaviours with inland populations. [more]
The Mississippi: An Anthropocene River initiative seeks to explore the ecological, historical, and social interactions between humans and the environment across the Mississippi River Basin. Scholars from both sides of the Atlantic are working directly with local and international scientists, social theorists, artists, and activists with interests and backgrounds spanning the biological and social sciences as well as the humanities and visual arts.

Department of Archaeology Contributes to the Anthropocene Curriculum

The Mississippi: An Anthropocene River initiative seeks to explore the ecological, historical, and social interactions between humans and the environment across the Mississippi River Basin. Scholars from both sides of the Atlantic are working directly with local and international scientists, social theorists, artists, and activists with interests and backgrounds spanning the biological and social sciences as well as the humanities and visual arts. [more]
The Institute will be hosting a variety of events from October 7-10 to bring awareness to these issues, organized by the Mental Health Awareness Week Committee.

Max Planck Mental Health Awareness Week at the Institute

The Institute will be hosting a variety of events from October 7-10 to bring awareness to these issues, organized by the Mental Health Awareness Week Committee. [more]
New study reveals the earliest microliths (small stone tools smaller than 40 millimeters) in South Asia and in any rainforest environment worldwide, alongside tree-dwelling monkeys, other small mammals, and tropical plants in a Sri Lankan Cave.

Oldest miniaturized stone toolkits in Eurasia

New study reveals the earliest microliths (small stone tools smaller than 40 millimeters) in South Asia and in any rainforest environment worldwide, alongside tree-dwelling monkeys, other small mammals, and tropical plants in a Sri Lankan Cave. [more]
Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A new review, led by scholars at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about megafaunal extinction.

Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world’s largest mammals

Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A new review, led by scholars at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about megafaunal extinction. [more]
Analysis of 34 ancient plague genomes from the Black Death and succeeding plague epidemics in Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries, reveals how the bacterium diversified after a single introduction.

Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

Analysis of 34 ancient plague genomes from the Black Death and succeeding plague epidemics in Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries, reveals how the bacterium diversified after a single introduction. [more]
With the tremendous success of the 2018 and 2019 events, the Department of Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is now calling for applications for our 2020 International Application of Archaeological Science Workshop. The workshop will be conducted in the Department’s research and laboratory facilities in Jena, Germany. Note that spaces are highly limited and only select applications will be funded.

International Application of Archaeological Science Workshop – 2020

With the tremendous success of the 2018 and 2019 events, the Department of Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is now calling for applications for our 2020 International Application of Archaeological Science Workshop. The workshop will be conducted in the Department’s research and laboratory facilities in Jena, Germany. Note that spaces are highly limited and only select applications will be funded. [more]
Modern humans evolved in Africa, and we now know that human groups from all over the continent contributed to that process. An international group of scientists says that means it is time to stop arguing about where in Africa humans “really” came from.

One species, many origins

Modern humans evolved in Africa, and we now know that human groups from all over the continent contributed to that process. An international group of scientists says that means it is time to stop arguing about where in Africa humans “really” came from. [more]
In the beginning of September, the Paleo-Science & History Independent Research Group held its third pre/post-doc workshop in interdisciplinary approaches to history – within just one year since the group’s foundation in the summer of 2018.

Paleo-Science & History Outreach Activities: spreading innovative methods for the collaboration of science and history

In the beginning of September, the Paleo-Science & History Independent Research Group held its third pre/post-doc workshop in interdisciplinary approaches to history – within just one year since the group’s foundation in the summer of 2018. [more]
By using age-mortality and species-selection profiles from prehistoric East Asia, researchers identified carp aquaculture in Henan Province, China, thousands of years earlier than previously reported.

New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

By using age-mortality and species-selection profiles from prehistoric East Asia, researchers identified carp aquaculture in Henan Province, China, thousands of years earlier than previously reported. [more]
Johannes Krause is one of the authors of the Jena Declaration by which evolutionary researchers and zoologists oppose seemingly scientific justifications for racism and argue that the concept of race lacks any biological basis. In zoology and anthropology, the authors concludes, "today and in the future, not using the term race should be part of scientific decency".Photo: Jürgen Scheere/FSU

Jena Declaration - The concept of race is the result of racism, not its prerequisite

Johannes Krause is one of the authors of the Jena Declaration by which evolutionary researchers and zoologists oppose seemingly scientific justifications for racism and argue that the concept of race lacks any biological basis. In zoology and anthropology, the authors concludes, "today and in the future, not using the term race should be part of scientific decency".
Photo: Jürgen Scheere/FSU [more]
 
loading content
Go to Editor View