Dog studies

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are done in a playful way.

Participants wanted!

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are done in a playful way. [more]

Latest publications

Antunes, A. C.; Baccaro, F.; Caetano Andrade, V. L.; Ramos, J. F.; Da Silva Moreira, R.; Barnett, A. A.: Igapó seed patches: a potentially key resource for terrestrial vertebrates in a seasonally flooded forest of central Amazonia. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (2019)
Scott, R. M.; Buckley, H. R.; Domett, K.; Tromp, M.; Trinh, H. H.; Willis, A.; Matsumura, H.; Oxenham, M. F.: Domestication and large animal interactions: Skeletal trauma in northern Vietnam during the hunter-gatherer Da But period. PLoS One 14 (9) (2019)
Rzymski, C.; Tresoldi, T.; Greenhill, S. J.; Wu, M.-S.; Schweikhard, N. E.; Koptjevskaja-Tamm, M.; Gast, V.; Bodt, T. A.; Hantgan, A.; Kaiping, G. A. et al.; Chang, S.; Lai, Y.; Morozova, N.; Arjava, H.; Hübler, N.; Koile, E.; Pepper, S.; Proos, M.; Epps, B. V.; Blanco, I.; Hundt, C.; Monakhov, S.; Pianykh, K.; Ramesh, S.; Gray, R. D.; Forkel, R.; List, J.-M.: The database of cross-linguistic colexifications, reproducible analysis of cross-linguistic polysemies. Humanities Commons (2019)
Moretti, F.; Sobchuk, O.: Hidden in Plain Sight: Data Visualization in the Humanities. New Left Review 118, pp. 86 - 115 (2019)
Yang, J.; Müller, N. F.; Bouckaert, R.; Xu, B.; Drummond, A. J.: Bayesian phylodynamics of avian influenza A virus H9N2 in Asia with time-dependent predictors of migration. PLoS Computational Biology 15 (8) (2019)
Saers, J. P.P.; Ryan, T. M.; Stock, J. T.: Trabecular bone structure scales allometrically in the foot of four human groups. Journal of Human Evolution 135 (2019)
Gretzinger, J.; Molak, M.; Reiter, E.; Pfrengle, S.; Urban, C.; Neukamm, J.; Blant, M.; Conard, N. J.; Cupillard, C.; Dimitrijević, V. et al.; Drucker, D. G.; Hofman-Kamińska, E.; Kowalczyk, R.; Krajcarz, M. T.; Krajcarz, M.; Münzel, S. C.; Peresani, M.; Romandini, M.; Rufí, I.; Soler, J.; Terlato, G.; Krause, J.; Bocherens, H.; Schuenemann, V. J.: Large-scale mitogenomic analysis of the phylogeography of the Late Pleistocene cave bear. Scientific Reports 9 (1), 10700 (2019)
Hellrich, J.; Rzymski, C.: Computational detection of medieval references in metal. In: Medievalism and Metal Music Studies: Throwing Down the Gauntlet (Eds. Barratt-Peacock, R.; Hagen, R.). Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley (2019)
Hellrich, J.; Rzymski, C.: The trans-medial fight for glory. In: Medievalism and Metal Music Studies: Throwing Down the Gauntlet (Eds. Barratt-Peacock, R.; Hagen, R.). Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley (2019)
List, J.-M.: Automated methods for the investigation of language contact, with a focus on lexical borrowing. Language and Linguistics Compass (2019)

A complete list of publications you can find here.

Events calendar

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Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Institute Profile

The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) in Jena was founded in 2014 to target fundamental questions of human history and evolution since the Paleolithic. From the vantage point of three interdisciplinary research departments – the Department of Archaeogenetics (Director Johannes Krause), the Department of Archaeology (Director Nicole Boivin), and the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution (Director Russell Gray) – the MPI-SHH pursues an integrative approach to the study of human history that bridges the traditional divide between the natural sciences and the humanities. [more]


News

In the beginning of September, the Paleo-Science & History Independent Research Group held its third pre/post-doc workshop in interdisciplinary approaches to history – within just one year since the group’s foundation in the summer of 2018.

Paleo-Science & History Outreach Activities: spreading innovative methods for the collaboration of science and history

In the beginning of September, the Paleo-Science & History Independent Research Group held its third pre/post-doc workshop in interdisciplinary approaches to history – within just one year since the group’s foundation in the summer of 2018. [more]
By using age-mortality and species-selection profiles from prehistoric East Asia, researchers identified carp aquaculture in Henan Province, China, thousands of years earlier than previously reported.

New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

By using age-mortality and species-selection profiles from prehistoric East Asia, researchers identified carp aquaculture in Henan Province, China, thousands of years earlier than previously reported.
Johannes Krause is one of the authors of the Jena Declaration by which evolutionary researchers and zoologists oppose seemingly scientific justifications for racism and argue that the concept of race lacks any biological basis. In zoology and anthropology, the authors concludes, "today and in the future, not using the term race should be part of scientific decency".Photo: Jürgen Scheere/FSU

Jena Declaration - The concept of race is the result of racism, not its prerequisite

Johannes Krause is one of the authors of the Jena Declaration by which evolutionary researchers and zoologists oppose seemingly scientific justifications for racism and argue that the concept of race lacks any biological basis. In zoology and anthropology, the authors concludes, "today and in the future, not using the term race should be part of scientific decency".
Photo: Jürgen Scheere/FSU [more]
Patrick Roberts and Robert Spengler of the Department of Archaeology discuss the role Jena played on the career and ideas of Alexander von Humboldt and the development of the disciplines of Ecology, Climate Science, and Evolutionary Biology. They highlight how this legacy can still be seen in new research in Jena focused on human interactions with the natural world and our planet's changing environments and species. Read the full article here:

Celebrating Humboldt's long legacy in Jena

Patrick Roberts and Robert Spengler of the Department of Archaeology discuss the role Jena played on the career and ideas of Alexander von Humboldt and the development of the disciplines of Ecology, Climate Science, and Evolutionary Biology. They highlight how this legacy can still be seen in new research in Jena focused on human interactions with the natural world and our planet's changing environments and species. Read the full article here: [more]
Scientific analysis of dental calculus of the victims of famine found evidence of corn, oats, potatoes, wheat and dairy foods.

Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine

Scientific analysis of dental calculus of the victims of famine found evidence of corn, oats, potatoes, wheat and dairy foods. [more]
The highly competitive grants will allow the recipients to fund research groups on their projects "PANTROPOCENE: Finding a Pre-industrial, Pan-tropical 'Anthropocene'", "MICROSCOPE: Zooming into the Population History of Iron Age Europe with Rare Genetic Variants", and "FEDD: Fruits of Eurasia: Domestication and Dispersal".

Patrick Roberts, Stephan Schiffels, and Robert Spengler awarded ERC Starting Grants

The highly competitive grants will allow the recipients to fund research groups on their projects "PANTROPOCENE: Finding a Pre-industrial, Pan-tropical 'Anthropocene'", "MICROSCOPE: Zooming into the Population History of Iron Age Europe with Rare Genetic Variants", and "FEDD: Fruits of Eurasia: Domestication and Dispersal". [more]
Oshan Wedage, a PhD researcher at the Department of Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has received one of the most prestigious scientific awards in his home country, Sri Lanka.

Oshan Wedage receives Sri Lankan President's Award for Scientific Research

Oshan Wedage, a PhD researcher at the Department of Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has received one of the most prestigious scientific awards in his home country, Sri Lanka. [more]
Humans caused significant environmental change around the globe by about 3,000-4,000 years ago, much earlier than prior estimates, as revealed by a new international study.

Archaeological assessment reveals Earth’s early transformation through land use

Humans caused significant environmental change around the globe by about 3,000-4,000 years ago, much earlier than prior estimates, as revealed by a new international study. [more]
The lake was thought to be the site of an ancient catastrophic event that left several hundred people dead, but the first ancient whole genome data from India shows that diverse groups of people died at the lake in multiple events approximately 1000 years apart.

Biomolecular analyses of Roopkund skeletons show Mediterranean migrants in Indian Himalayas

The lake was thought to be the site of an ancient catastrophic event that left several hundred people dead, but the first ancient whole genome data from India shows that diverse groups of people died at the lake in multiple events approximately 1000 years apart. [more]
When and how did Homo sapiens succeed in inhabiting Mongolia and adapting to the sometimes extreme environmental conditions? The video shows the work of the archaeologists on site and gives an insight into how the laboratory succeeds in drawing an ever more differentiated and complete picture of the human past from the samples obtained.

New Video: Mongolia Field Work and the Report of the Govi-Altai Cave and Palaeolake Survey

When and how did Homo sapiens succeed in inhabiting Mongolia and adapting to the sometimes extreme environmental conditions? The video shows the work of the archaeologists on site and gives an insight into how the laboratory succeeds in drawing an ever more differentiated and complete picture of the human past from the samples obtained. [more]
Stable isotope analysis of mollusc reveals that humans seasonally foraged taxa on basis of meat yields in Mesolithic northern Iberia

Seasonal Seafood in the Mesolithic: New study reveals humans foraged molluscs in winter for better meat returns

Stable isotope analysis of mollusc reveals that humans seasonally foraged taxa on basis of meat yields in Mesolithic northern Iberia [more]
Date: August 7-9, 2019Room: Villa V04Host: Department of ArchaeogeneticsOrganizer: Kathrin Nägele

Workshop: Interactions in pre-Columbian Cuba. Adding detail to the transition from the Archaic to the Ceramic Age

Date: August 7-9, 2019
Room: Villa V04
Host: Department of Archaeogenetics
Organizer: Kathrin Nägele [more]
New study explores genetic roots of 26 populations from diverse regions and cultures of western South America and Mexico, revealing long-distance connections between speakers of the same language, and new traces of genetic diversity within Amazonia.

Human genetic diversity of South America reveals complex history of Amazonia

New study explores genetic roots of 26 populations from diverse regions and cultures of western South America and Mexico, revealing long-distance connections between speakers of the same language, and new traces of genetic diversity within Amazonia. [more]
All of the plants on our kitchen tables have a long and mysterious history. Many of them can trace part of their ancestry back to the ancient Silk Road trade routes. New archaeobotanical data is illustrating how the domestication and dispersal process for the plants unfolded, as presented in Dr. Spengler’s new book.

New book "Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat" by Dr. Robert N. Spengler III  

July 25, 2019

All of the plants on our kitchen tables have a long and mysterious history. Many of them can trace part of their ancestry back to the ancient Silk Road trade routes. New archaeobotanical data is illustrating how the domestication and dispersal process for the plants unfolded, as presented in Dr. Spengler’s new book. [more]
The Department of Archaeology is proud to extend our congratulations to Dr. Jillian Swift who has recently started a position as Archaeologist at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, Hawai’i in the United States.

Another Department of Archaeology post-doc officially starts a museum research position in the United States of America

The Department of Archaeology is proud to extend our congratulations to Dr. Jillian Swift who has recently started a position as Archaeologist at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, Hawai’i in the United States. [more]
Professor Michael Petraglia is a new affiliate of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.  As one of his first teaching assignments he gave a week-long course to one hundred Ph.D. and Master’s level students entitled: "Human Evolution and Climate Change".

Michael Petraglia affiliated with the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Professor Michael Petraglia is a new affiliate of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.  As one of his first teaching assignments he gave a week-long course to one hundred Ph.D. and Master’s level students entitled: "Human Evolution and Climate Change". [more]
The Arab-German Young Academy of Sciences and Humanities (AGYA) was established in 2013 by the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain.

Eleanor Scerri elected a member of Arab-German Young Academy of Sciences and Humanities

The Arab-German Young Academy of Sciences and Humanities (AGYA) was established in 2013 by the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain. [more]
The ancestral relatives of millets and other small-seeded crops originally evolved to be dispersed by megafaunal grazers of the Pleistocene and earlier epochs, and in some cases later came to rely on pastoral herds to disperse their seeds.

Grazing Animals Drove Domestication of Grain Crops

The ancestral relatives of millets and other small-seeded crops originally evolved to be dispersed by megafaunal grazers of the Pleistocene and earlier epochs, and in some cases later came to rely on pastoral herds to disperse their seeds.

[more]
The Department of Archaeology is proud to announce that three of its current postdoctoral researchers have been awarded tenure track professorships in the United States.

Three Department of Archaeology post-docs win tenure-track positions in the United States

The Department of Archaeology is proud to announce that three of its current postdoctoral researchers have been awarded tenure track professorships in the United States. [more]
Ancient genomes suggest that the Philistines descended from people who migrated across the Mediterranean and reached the shores of the southern Levant at the beginning of the Iron Age.

Ancient DNA sheds light on the origins of the Biblical Philistines

Ancient genomes suggest that the Philistines descended from people who migrated across the Mediterranean and reached the shores of the southern Levant at the beginning of the Iron Age. [more]
The Otto Hahn Medal is awarded annually by the Max Planck Society to approximately 30 young researchers for best PhD thesis. The prizes are awarded at the general meeting of the MPG each June and are among the most prestigious honors for PhD students in Germany.

Maria Spyrou of the MPI-SHH receives Otto Hahn Medal for 2018

The Otto Hahn Medal is awarded annually by the Max Planck Society to approximately 30 young researchers for best PhD thesis. The prizes are awarded at the general meeting of the MPG each June and are among the most prestigious honors for PhD students in Germany. [more]
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. This study provides some of the earliest clear evidence for the use of cannabis for its psychoactive compounds, and the awareness of higher THC-producing varieties of the plant.

The Origins of Cannabis Smoking: Marijuana Use in the First Millennium BC

A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. This study provides some of the earliest clear evidence for the use of cannabis for its psychoactive compounds, and the awareness of higher THC-producing varieties of the plant. [more]
In examining prehistoric coastal sites on the Arabian Peninsula, researchers found that even large sites have been affected by coastal erosion due to sea-level rise.  Past studies of the diet of coastal populations may now need to be reevaluated given the potential underestimation of shellfish use.

Rising sea levels have destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites

In examining prehistoric coastal sites on the Arabian Peninsula, researchers found that even large sites have been affected by coastal erosion due to sea-level rise.  Past studies of the diet of coastal populations may now need to be reevaluated given the potential underestimation of shellfish use. [more]
Date & Time: Jun 14, 2019, 13:00Speaker: Dr. Juliane Kaminski, Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, UKRoom: Villa V14Host: Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution

Distinguished Lecture by Dr. Juliane Kaminski: "Through a dog's eyes: Domestication and the dog-human bond"

Date & Time: Jun 14, 2019, 13:00
Speaker: Dr. Juliane Kaminski, Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, UK
Room: Villa V14
Host: Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution [more]
Strengthening of political networks coincided with the intensification of agricultural production, resulting in the widespread adoption of millet by populations across Eurasia.

Dramatic change in ancient pastoralist diets associated with expansion of political networks across the Eurasian steppe

Strengthening of political networks coincided with the intensification of agricultural production, resulting in the widespread adoption of millet by populations across Eurasia. [more]
An ancient population of Arctic hunter-gatherers, known as Paleo-Eskimos, made a significant genetic contribution to populations living in Arctic North America today.

Ancient DNA sheds light on the migration and impact of Arctic hunter-gatherers to North America about 5000 years ago

An ancient population of Arctic hunter-gatherers, known as Paleo-Eskimos, made a significant genetic contribution to populations living in Arctic North America today. [more]
Date & Time: Jun. 6, 2019, 14:00Speaker: Huw GroucuttMax Planck Research Group Extreme EventsPlease note the location: MPI for Biogeochemistry, Jena

Extreme events in biological, societal and earth systems

Date & Time: Jun. 6, 2019, 14:00
Speaker: Huw Groucutt
Max Planck Research Group Extreme Events
Please note the location: MPI for Biogeochemistry, Jena [more]
Analysis of 8 new plague genomes from the first plague pandemic reveals previously unknown levels of plague diversity, and provides the first genetic evidence of the Justinianic Plague in the British Isles.

Details of first historically recorded plague pandemic revealed by ancient genomes

Analysis of 8 new plague genomes from the first plague pandemic reveals previously unknown levels of plague diversity, and provides the first genetic evidence of the Justinianic Plague in the British Isles. [more]
 
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