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The intelligent dog

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are strictly observational and done in playful way.

Participants wanted

We are investigating the cognitive abilities of dogs, and we are looking for participants. All studies are strictly observational and done in playful way. [more]

Latest publications

1.
Patrick Roberts, Dylan Gaffney, Julia Lee-Thorp, and Glenn Summerhayes, "Persistent tropical foraging in the highlands of terminal Pleistocene/Holocene New Guinea," Nature Ecology & Evolution 1, 0044 (2017).
2.
Johann-Mattis List, Simon J. Greenhill, and Russell D. Gray, "The Potential of automatic word comparison for historical linguistics," PLoS One , 0170046 (2017).
3.
Hong-Bing Yao, Chuan-Chao Wang, Jiang Wang, Xiaolan Tao, Lei Shang, Shao-Qing Wen, Qiajun Du, Qiongying Deng, Bingying Xu, Ying Huang, Hong-Dan Wang, Shujin Li, Bin Cong, Liying Ma, Li Jin, Johannes Krause, and Hui Li, "Genetic structure of Tibetan populations in Gansu revealed by forensic STR loci," Scientific Reports 7, 41195 (2017).

A complete list of publications you can find here.

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Megafauna and Methods: New Approaches to the Study of Megafaunal Extinctions

Workshop Feb. 20. - Feb. 21. at MPI for the Science of Human History [more]

Persistent tropical foraging in the highlands of terminal Pleistocene/Holocene New Guinea

Foraging lifestyles persisted in New Guinean tropical forest environments even after the advent of farming 8,000 years ago. [more]

The quantitative turn in historical linguistics

Latest study reveals 89% success-rate of computational detection of word relationships across language families. [more]

Distinguished Lecturer Seminar Series

Guest lecture by Matthew Collins on the topic of "Survival and utility of ancient proteins in archaeology" on January, 25. [more]

Institute Profile

The overarching goal of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History is to explore the human past over the long term using state-of-the-art analytical, genetic, archaeological and computational methods. Scientists from a broad range of diverse disciplines, including genetics, linguistics, archeology, anthropology and history, work together at the institute to answer fundamental questions about human biological and cultural evolution from the Palaeolithic until today. They also jointly develop innovative methods, in particular in the areas of genome and proteome sequencing, archaeological science, language databases, bioinformatics and phylogeography.

 

The institute was founded in March 2014. The founding directors are Johannes Krause, who leads the Department of Archaeogenetics, and and Russell Gray, who directs the Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution. A third Department, the Department of Archaeology, is directed by Nicole Boivin and began on August 1, 2016.

 

With the establishment of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, historical and evolutionary research finds a home where a broad range of biological and cultural questions about human history and development can be addressed using innovative methods, while Jena re-emerges as a global centre for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies [PDF].

Predecessor Institute

Before the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History was established the Max Planck Institute of Economics was located in Jena from 1993 until 2014.
 
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