Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Institute Profile
The Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) in Jena was founded in 2014 to target fundamental questions of human history and evolution since the Paleolithic. From the vantage point of three interdisciplinary research departments the MPI-SHH pursues an integrative approach to the study of human history that bridges the traditional divide between the natural sciences and the humanities. [more]

Our inaugural monthly "Work-in-Progress" seminar featuring: Paul Heggarty (DLCE), Monica Tromp (DA) and Cosimo Posth (DAG)Date: January 18, 2018Time: 15:00Room: Villa V14

Cross-Departmental Work-in-Progress Seminar

Our inaugural monthly "Work-in-Progress" seminar featuring: Paul Heggarty (DLCE), Monica Tromp (DA) and Cosimo Posth (DAG)
Date: January 18, 2018
Time: 15:00
Room: Villa V14 [more]
Salmonella enterica, the bacterium responsible for enteric fever, may be the long-debated cause of the 1545-1550 AD “cocoliztli” epidemic in Oaxaca, Mexico that heavily affected the native population.

Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identified

Salmonella enterica, the bacterium responsible for enteric fever, may be the long-debated cause of the 1545-1550 AD “cocoliztli” epidemic in Oaxaca, Mexico that heavily affected the native population. [more]
Sabin, a PhD student in the Department of Archaeogenetics, was awarded the grant for the project “Revealing the History of Human Tuberculosis with Diverse Ancient and Modern Pathogen Genomes.”

Susanna Sabin wins prestigious Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork Grant

Sabin, a PhD student in the Department of Archaeogenetics, was awarded the grant for the project “Revealing the History of Human Tuberculosis with Diverse Ancient and Modern Pathogen Genomes.” [more]
Johannes Krause presents a lecture for the KinderUni for the Museumslöwen e.V. Gotha at the Gotha Public Library about our relationship with Neanderthals.

“Why is there a little Neanderthal in each of us?”

Johannes Krause presents a lecture for the KinderUni for the Museumslöwen e.V. Gotha at the Gotha Public Library about our relationship with Neanderthals. [more]
DNA analysis of present-day populations in the Chachapoyas region of Peru indicates that the original inhabitants were not uprooted en masse by the Inca Empire’s expansion into this area hundreds of years ago.

Genetics preserves traces of ancient resistance to Inca rule

DNA analysis of present-day populations in the Chachapoyas region of Peru indicates that the original inhabitants were not uprooted en masse by the Inca Empire’s expansion into this area hundreds of years ago. [more]
Lecture by Irina VelskoDate: Dec. 13, 2017, 13:30Room: Villa V03Host: Department of Archaeogenetics"Ancient Microbiomes and the Accuracy of Taxonomic Classifiers."

Metagenomics Workshop

Lecture by Irina Velsko
Date: Dec. 13, 2017, 13:30
Room: Villa V03
Host: Department of Archaeogenetics
"Ancient Microbiomes and the Accuracy of Taxonomic Classifiers."

[more]
Date: Dec 13, 2017, 15:30Speaker: Bernard Joseph HinnebuschChief, Plague Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, National Institutes of Health (USA)Room: Villa V14Host: Department of Archaeogenetics

Ecological opportunity, evolution, and the emergence of flea-borne plague

Date: Dec 13, 2017, 15:30
Speaker: Bernard Joseph Hinnebusch
Chief, Plague Section, Laboratory of Bacteriology, National Institutes of Health (USA)
Room: Villa V14
Host: Department of Archaeogenetics [more]
Technological advances and multidisciplinary research teams are reshaping our understanding of when and how humans left Africa – and who they met along the way.

Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across Eurasia

Technological advances and multidisciplinary research teams are reshaping our understanding of when and how humans left Africa – and who they met along the way. [more]
This workshop will bring together different specialists working in South Asia to share results and facilitate an inter-disciplinary approach to uncovering the past of this diverse region "crossroads".Date: Dec. 15, 9:00-18:00Host: Department of ArchaeologyOrganizer: Ayushi Nayak (nayak@shh.mpg.de)

Crossroads: Multidisciplinary investigations of South Asia's past

This workshop will bring together different specialists working in South Asia to share results and facilitate an inter-disciplinary approach to uncovering the past of this diverse region "crossroads".
Date: Dec. 15, 9:00-18:00
Host: Department of Archaeology
Organizer: Ayushi Nayak (nayak@shh.mpg.de) [more]
The MPI-SHH Adventures in Archaeology coloring book, debuted at the Long Night of Sciences, is now available for download in three languages - with more on the way!EnglishGerman/DeutschSpanish/Español

"Adventures in Archaeology!"

The MPI-SHH Adventures in Archaeology coloring book, debuted at the Long Night of Sciences, is now available for download in three languages - with more on the way!
English
German/Deutsch
Spanish/Español

Joint workshop Department of Archaeogenetics and Department of Linguistic and Cultural EvolutionMPI-SHH, 29. Nov. - 1. Dec. 2017Organizers: Russell Gray, Wolfgang Haak, Johannes Krause

LAG2 – The origin and expansion of Uralic speaking populations

Joint workshop Department of Archaeogenetics and Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution
MPI-SHH, 29. Nov. - 1. Dec. 2017
Organizers: Russell Gray, Wolfgang Haak, Johannes Krause
Join us at our institute on Nov. 24 from 6pm to midnight for the Long Night of Sciences! There will be exciting activities, talks, and videos for all ages. [PDF]

Long Night of Sciences on Nov. 24, 2017

Join us at our institute on Nov. 24 from 6pm to midnight for the Long Night of Sciences! There will be exciting activities, talks, and videos for all ages. [PDF]
The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis may have first come to Europe with the large-scale migration of steppe nomads in the Stone Age, millennia before the first known historical epidemics.

Plague Likely a Stone Age Arrival to Central Europe

The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis may have first come to Europe with the large-scale migration of steppe nomads in the Stone Age, millennia before the first known historical epidemics. [more]
In comparison to central and northern Europe, the Iberian Peninsula saw a faster fusion of early farmer populations, who migrated to the region from the Near East, and local hunter-gatherers.

DNA analyses provide information about the settling of the Iberian Peninsula

In comparison to central and northern Europe, the Iberian Peninsula saw a faster fusion of early farmer populations, who migrated to the region from the Near East, and local hunter-gatherers. [more]
Early farmers who migrated to Europe from the Near East spread quickly across the continent, where they lived side-by-side with existing local hunter-gatherers while slowly mixing with those groups over time.

Neolithic farmers coexisted with hunter-gatherers for centuries after spreading across Europe

Early farmers who migrated to Europe from the Near East spread quickly across the continent, where they lived side-by-side with existing local hunter-gatherers while slowly mixing with those groups over time. [more]
Researchers from the MPI-SHH have found what may be the oldest-known images of dogs, some of whom are wearing leashes. The original study, published in the Journal of Anthropolical Archaeology, is described in Science Magazine (with accompanying video).

Pre-Neolithic evidence for dog-assisted hunting strategies in Arabia

Researchers from the MPI-SHH have found what may be the oldest-known images of dogs, some of whom are wearing leashes. The original study, published in the Journal of Anthropolical Archaeology, is described in Science Magazine (with accompanying video). [more]
The orientation of strokes within letters reveals surprising patterns that hardly changed in 3000 years.

Legibility emerges spontaneously, rather than evolving over time

The orientation of strokes within letters reveals surprising patterns that hardly changed in 3000 years. [more]
The project, headed by Michael Petraglia of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, receives Dr. Abdul Rahman Al Ansari Award for Serving Kingdom’s Antiquities for a Pioneering Non-Saudi Group at the 1st Saudi Archeology Convention.

Green Arabia project wins award for archaeological work in Saudi Arabia

The project, headed by Michael Petraglia of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, receives Dr. Abdul Rahman Al Ansari Award for Serving Kingdom’s Antiquities for a Pioneering Non-Saudi Group at the 1st Saudi Archeology Convention. [more]