Contact

Sylvia Arnold-El Fehri
Sylvia Arnold-El Fehri
Department assistant
Phone: +49 3641 686-621
Fax: +49 3641 686-623
Johanna Allner
Johanna Allner
Personal Assistant to Prof. Dr. Johannes Krause
Phone: +49 3641 686-610
Fax: +49 3641 686-623
Anke Trinkler
Anke Trinkler
Assistant, Travel Manager
Phone: +49 (0) 3641 686-606

News from the Department of Archaeogenetics

The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis may have first come to Europe with the large-scale migration of steppe nomads in the Stone Age, millennia before the first known historical epidemics.

Plague Likely a Stone Age Arrival to Central Europe

The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis may have first come to Europe with the large-scale migration of steppe nomads in the Stone Age, millennia before the first known historical epidemics. [more]
In comparison to central and northern Europe, the Iberian Peninsula saw a faster fusion of early farmer populations, who migrated to the region from the Near East, and local hunter-gatherers.

DNA analyses provide information about the settling of the Iberian Peninsula

In comparison to central and northern Europe, the Iberian Peninsula saw a faster fusion of early farmer populations, who migrated to the region from the Near East, and local hunter-gatherers. [more]
Early farmers who migrated to Europe from the Near East spread quickly across the continent, where they lived side-by-side with existing local hunter-gatherers while slowly mixing with those groups over time.

Neolithic farmers coexisted with hunter-gatherers for centuries after spreading across Europe

Early farmers who migrated to Europe from the Near East spread quickly across the continent, where they lived side-by-side with existing local hunter-gatherers while slowly mixing with those groups over time. [more]
The recipients, nominated by Nobel Laureates and members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, are chosen from all scientific fields.

Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History Scientist named one of the Top 10 “Scientists to Watch” in 2017

The recipients, nominated by Nobel Laureates and members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, are chosen from all scientific fields. [more]
The partners of the new Max Planck-Harvard Research Center are investing a total of five million Euros in order to understand the key processes that shaped human history in the ancient Mediterranean by using cutting-edge scientific approaches.

Shedding new light on the Ancient Mediterranean

The partners of the new Max Planck-Harvard Research Center are investing a total of five million Euros in order to understand the key processes that shaped human history in the ancient Mediterranean by using cutting-edge scientific approaches. [more]
Genetic analyses uncover lost human populations and surprising relationships, revealing a complex history of population movements in ancient Africa.

First large-scale ancient genomes study from sub-Saharan African skeletons lifts veil on prehistoric populations

Genetic analyses uncover lost human populations and surprising relationships, revealing a complex history of population movements in ancient Africa. [more]
4000 years ago, European women traveled far from their home villages to start their families, bringing with them new cultural objects and ideas.

Mobile women were key to cultural exchange in Stone Age and Bronze Age Europe

4000 years ago, European women traveled far from their home villages to start their families, bringing with them new cultural objects and ideas. [more]
"Genomic insights into the relationship between ancient Japanese and modern East Eurasians."Date: Aug 16, 2017Time: 14:00 - 15:30Host: eurasia3angle & DAG

Talk by Hideaki Kanzawa-Kiriyama

"Genomic insights into the relationship between ancient Japanese and modern East Eurasians."
Date: Aug 16, 2017
Time: 14:00 - 15:30
Host: eurasia3angle & DAG [more]
The mysterious Minoans descended primarily from local Stone Age farmers, as did their cultural counterpart, the Mycenaeans – and their descendants still inhabit Greece today.

Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans

The mysterious Minoans descended primarily from local Stone Age farmers, as did their cultural counterpart, the Mycenaeans – and their descendants still inhabit Greece today.
Mitochondrial DNA from Neanderthal individual who died in Swabian Jura in modern-day southwest Germany suggests that Neanderthals received genetic contribution from Africa by hominins that are closely related to modern humans more than 220,000 years ago.

DNA of early Neanderthal gives timeline for new modern human-related dispersal from Africa    

Mitochondrial DNA from Neanderthal individual who died in Swabian Jura in modern-day southwest Germany suggests that Neanderthals received genetic contribution from Africa by hominins that are closely related to modern humans more than 220,000 years ago. [more]
Study finds that ancient Egyptians were most closely related to ancient populations from the Near East.

The First Genome Data from Ancient Egyptian Mummies

Study finds that ancient Egyptians were most closely related to ancient populations from the Near East.
On April 25, 2017, Prof. Dr. Johannes Krause from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena was awarded the Thuringian Research Prize for Top Performance in Basic Research by the Thuringian Ministry of Economy, Science and the Digital Society.

Johannes Krause Awarded 22nd Annual Thuringian Research Prize for Top Performance in Basic Research

On April 25, 2017, Prof. Dr. Johannes Krause from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena was awarded the Thuringian Research Prize for Top Performance in Basic Research by the Thuringian Ministry of Economy, Science and the Digital Society.
"Using isotopes to track past human migrations"Date: Apr 12, 2017Time: 15:00 - 16:30Host: Department of Archaeogenetics
 

Talk by Michael Richards

"Using isotopes to track past human migrations"
Date: Apr 12, 2017
Time: 15:00 - 16:30
Host: Department of Archaeogenetics
 
BioArCaucasus - Meeting

DAG Workshop

BioArCaucasus - Meeting

[more]
With their research project “Heirloom Microbes: The History and Legacy of Ancient Dairying Bacteria”, Dr. Jessica Hendy (Department of Archaeology) and Prof. Christina Warinner (Department of Archaeogenetics) have won the Max Planck Society’s Annual Donation Award 2017 in the amount of 200,000 €.

The hidden bacterial legacy of ancient cultures

With their research project “Heirloom Microbes: The History and Legacy of Ancient Dairying Bacteria”, Dr. Jessica Hendy (Department of Archaeology) and Prof. Christina Warinner (Department of Archaeogenetics) have won the Max Planck Society’s Annual Donation Award 2017 in the amount of 200,000 €. [more]
Insights into human evolutionary biology from ancient DNA

MPI-SHH Distinguished Lecturer Seminar Series

Insights into human evolutionary biology from ancient DNA [more]
Only some 3500 years ago people began to colonize the South Pacific archipelagos of Oceania. An international team of researchers including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena now analyzed for the first time, the genomes of the first settlers who lived on the island chains Tonga and Vanuatu 3100-2500 years ago.

Archaeogenetics reveals unknown migration in the South Pacific

Only some 3500 years ago people began to colonize the South Pacific archipelagos of Oceania. An international team of researchers including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena now analyzed for the first time, the genomes of the first settlers who lived on the island chains Tonga and Vanuatu 3100-2500 years ago.
Archaeologicaland genetic research about the timing and process of the colonization of theAmericas has revealed an early colonization 15,000-20,000 years ago followed bya “Beringian standstill”, and subsequent expansion from the North as well as alater expansion of Inuit-Aleut peoples. Ancient DNA analyses have contributed toour understanding of this process using first mitochondrial DNA and more recentlynuclear DNA data.

MPI-SHH Distinguished Lecturer Seminar Series

Archaeologicaland genetic research about the timing and process of the colonization of theAmericas has revealed an early colonization 15,000-20,000 years ago followed bya “Beringian standstill”, and subsequent expansion from the North as well as alater expansion of Inuit-Aleut peoples. Ancient DNA analyses have contributed toour understanding of this process using first mitochondrial DNA and more recentlynuclear DNA data. [more]
For the first time, scientists have succeeded to fully reconstruct a genome of the Justinianic Plague causative pathogen, Yersinia pestis, from a skeleton of a victim excavated 50 years ago in Altenerding, Southern Germany.

Shedding light on the Justinian plague

For the first time, scientists have succeeded to fully reconstruct a genome of the Justinianic Plague causative pathogen, Yersinia pestis, from a skeleton of a victim excavated 50 years ago in Altenerding, Southern Germany. [more]
An international team of researchers including scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has succeeded for the first time in sequencing the genome of Chalcolithic barley grains.

Genome of 6,000-year-old barley grains sequenced for first time

An international team of researchers including scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has succeeded for the first time in sequencing the genome of Chalcolithic barley grains.

An international team of researchers led by Hélène Rougier with participation of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History presents the first case of Neandertal cannibalism in Northern Europe and the first example of multiple Neandertal bones used as tools from a single site.

Neandertal cannibalism and Neandertal bones used as tools in Northern Europe

An international team of researchers led by Hélène Rougier with participation of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History presents the first case of Neandertal cannibalism in Northern Europe and the first example of multiple Neandertal bones used as tools from a single site. [more]
A single strain of plague bacteria sparked multiple historical and modern pandemics. This was revealed by the analysis of three reconstructed historical genomes from the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, isolated from plague victims between the 14th and 16th century.

European Black Death as source of modern plague

A single strain of plague bacteria sparked multiple historical and modern pandemics. This was revealed by the analysis of three reconstructed historical genomes from the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, isolated from plague victims between the 14th and 16th century.

[more]
Researchers paint a genetic portrait of Ice Age Europe
Fu, Q.; Posth, C.; Hajdinjak, M.; Petr, M.; Mallick, S.; Fernandes , D.; Furtwängler , A.; Haak, W.; Meyer, M.; Mittnik, A. et al.:  The genetic history of Ice Age Europe. Nature 534 (7606), pp. 200-205 (2016)

History on Ice

Researchers paint a genetic portrait of Ice Age Europe

Fu, Q.; Posth, C.; Hajdinjak, M.; Petr, M.; Mallick, S.; Fernandes , D.; Furtwängler , A.; Haak, W.; Meyer, M.; Mittnik, A. et al.:  The genetic history of Ice Age Europe. Nature 534 (7606), pp. 200-205 (2016)

[more]
Up to now, the dispersal of modern humans outside of Africa is a highly debated topic both in terms of the number of major expansions and their timing. An international team of researchers retrieved DNA from 35 ancient hunter-gatherers spanning almost 30,000 years of European pre-history.

Europe’s population dramatically changed at the end of the last Ice Age

Up to now, the dispersal of modern humans outside of Africa is a highly debated topic both in terms of the number of major expansions and their timing. An international team of researchers retrieved DNA from 35 ancient hunter-gatherers spanning almost 30,000 years of European pre-history.

Historical pathogens survived for more than four centuries in Europe
Bos, K.; Herbig, A.; Sahl, J.; Waglechner, N.; Fourment, M.; Forrest, S. A.; Klunk, J.; Schuenemann, V. J.; Poinar, D.; Kuch, M. et al.: Eighteenth century Yersinia pestis genomes reveal the long-term persistence of an historical plague focus.

The hideout of the Black Death

Historical pathogens survived for more than four centuries in Europe

Bos, K.; Herbig, A.; Sahl, J.; Waglechner, N.; Fourment, M.; Forrest, S. A.; Klunk, J.; Schuenemann, V. J.; Poinar, D.; Kuch, M. et al.: Eighteenth century Yersinia pestis genomes reveal the long-term persistence of an historical plague focus.

Nowadays, the bacterium Helicobacter pylori is present in the stomachs of approximately one-half of the world's population. Under unfavourable conditions, it can cause stomach ulcers and even cancer. An international research team involving researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has now succeeded in decoding an H. pylori genome from the 5,300-year-old glacier mummy Oetzi.

Gastritis pathogens found in Oetzi the iceman

Nowadays, the bacterium Helicobacter pylori is present in the stomachs of approximately one-half of the world's population. Under unfavourable conditions, it can cause stomach ulcers and even cancer. An international research team involving researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has now succeeded in decoding an H. pylori genome from the 5,300-year-old glacier mummy Oetzi.

 
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