Contact

Johanna Allner
Johanna Allner
Phone: +49 3641 686-610
Fax: +49 3641 686-623
Sylvia Arnold-El Fehri
Sylvia Arnold-El Fehri
Phone: +49 3641 686-621
Fax: +49 3641 686-623
Room: 210
Anke Trinkler
Anke Trinkler
Phone: +49 (0) 3641 686-606

News from the Department of Archaeogenetics

Heirloom Microbes Project WorkshopDate: June 17-20, 2018Room: Villa V03Host: Heirloom Microbes Project

Microbial Diversity of Traditional Dairy Ecologies

Heirloom Microbes Project Workshop
Date: June 17-20, 2018
Room: Villa V03
Host: Heirloom Microbes Project [more]
A pair of 3,800-year-old skeletons buried together in Russia test positive for a strain of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis that is ancestral to the strain that caused the Black Death.

Oldest bubonic plague genome decoded

A pair of 3,800-year-old skeletons buried together in Russia test positive for a strain of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis that is ancestral to the strain that caused the Black Death. [more]
Date & Time: May 16, 2018, 15:30 Room: Villa V14 Host:  Johannes Krause, Department of Archaeogenetics

Distinguised Lecture by Ludovic Orlando: Tracking Six Millenia of Horse Selection, Admixture and Management with Complete Genome Time-Series

Date & Time: May 16, 2018, 15:30
Room: Villa V14
Host: Johannes Krause, Department of Archaeogenetics [more]
The largest study to date on ancient leprosy DNA reveals previously unknown diversity of strains in Medieval Europe.

A European origin for leprosy?

The largest study to date on ancient leprosy DNA reveals previously unknown diversity of strains in Medieval Europe. [more]
Study recovers oldest viral genomes, and shows the hepatitis B virus has been circulating in Europe for at least 7000 years.

Stone age hepatitis B virus decoded

Study recovers oldest viral genomes, and shows the hepatitis B virus has been circulating in Europe for at least 7000 years. [more]
Date & Time: May 2, 2018, 15:30 Room: Villa V14 Hosts:  Johannes Krause & Christina Warinner, Department of Archaeogenetics

Distinguished Lecture by Prof. Norman Hammond - “Archaeology, Epigraphy, and Identity: Problems in Maya Pre/History”

Date & Time: May 2, 2018, 15:30
Room: Villa V14
Hosts: Johannes Krause & Christina Warinner, Department of Archaeogenetics [more]
The "Adventures in Archaeological Science" Coloring Book has been translated into over a dozen languages and has been distributed to collaborators and friends in countries far and wide, from Mongolia to Mexico.

"Adventures in Archaeological Science" Coloring Book travels the world

The "Adventures in Archaeological Science" Coloring Book has been translated into over a dozen languages and has been distributed to collaborators and friends in countries far and wide, from Mongolia to Mexico. [more]
The new field of palaeoproteomics, harnessing cutting-edge techniques to analyze ancient proteins, is growing quickly. Researchers set out standards and precautions that aim to provide it with a firm foundation.

New standards for ancient protein studies set forth by multi-national group of researchers

The new field of palaeoproteomics, harnessing cutting-edge techniques to analyze ancient proteins, is growing quickly. Researchers set out standards and precautions that aim to provide it with a firm foundation. [more]
The ERC has selected Wolfgang Haak of the Department of Archaeogenetics as one of the 2017 recipients for its highly competitive Consolidator Grant, for his project "PALEoRIDER - Human health and migration in prehistory."

Wolfgang Haak awarded ERC Consolidator Grant for his project PALEoRIDER

The ERC has selected Wolfgang Haak of the Department of Archaeogenetics as one of the 2017 recipients for its highly competitive Consolidator Grant, for his project "PALEoRIDER - Human health and migration in prehistory." [more]
Ancient nuclear DNA from 15,000-year-old modern humans from Morocco, the oldest ever recovered from Africa, shows dual genetic ancestry to ancient Near Eastern and to sub-Saharan African populations.

Scientists discover genomic ancestry of Stone Age North Africans from Morocco, which shows links to the Near East and sub-Saharan Africa

Ancient nuclear DNA from 15,000-year-old modern humans from Morocco, the oldest ever recovered from Africa, shows dual genetic ancestry to ancient Near Eastern and to sub-Saharan African populations.
Speaker: Prof. Kyle Harper, Professor of Classics and Letters, Senior Vice President and Provost, University of OklahomaDate & Time: Mar. 22, 2018, 15:30 Room: Villa V14 Hosts:  Johannes Krause & Christina Warinner, Department of Archaeogenetics

Distinguished Lecture by Prof. Kyle Harper - “Patterns of Disease in the Roman Empire”

Speaker: Prof. Kyle Harper, Professor of Classics and Letters, Senior Vice President and Provost, University of Oklahoma
Date & Time: Mar. 22, 2018, 15:30
Room: Villa V14
Hosts: Johannes Krause & Christina Warinner, Department of Archaeogenetics [more]
This month we will be highlighting female employees and their work, beginning with Director Nicole Boivin of the Department of Archaeology. Check back here throughout the month for updates!

International Women's Day 2018 at the MPI-SHH

This month we will be highlighting female employees and their work, beginning with Director Nicole Boivin of the Department of Archaeology. Check back here throughout the month for updates! [more]
New genetic research explains how Austronesian languages were retained throughout its history despite near-total replacement of early Austronesian-Lapita with Papuan ancestry.

Ancient DNA reveals genetic replacement despite language continuity in the South Pacific

New genetic research explains how Austronesian languages were retained throughout its history despite near-total replacement of early Austronesian-Lapita with Papuan ancestry. [more]
Second largest ancient DNA study provides insight into the arrival of the first farmers to Europe and their interactions with hunter-gatherers.

Ancient DNA study reveals the prehistory of Southeastern Europe

Second largest ancient DNA study provides insight into the arrival of the first farmers to Europe and their interactions with hunter-gatherers. [more]
Largest ancient DNA study ever conducted answers the long-debated question of whether the spread of “Beaker” pottery was due to population migrations or the movement of cultural ideas.

Ancient DNA reveals impact of the “Beaker Phenomenon” on prehistoric Europeans

Largest ancient DNA study ever conducted answers the long-debated question of whether the spread of “Beaker” pottery was due to population migrations or the movement of cultural ideas. [more]
A research team from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tübingen examines the genetic material of 18th century German architect George Bähr to learn more about his appearance and health.

A typical Central European - The genome of the architect of the Dresden Frauenkirche deciphered

A research team from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Tübingen examines the genetic material of 18th century German architect George Bähr to learn more about his appearance and health. [more]
Analysis of ancient DNA found that Scandinavia was settled by hunter-gatherers via a southern and a northern route, and reveals that agriculture was likely introduced by migrating agriculturalists.

Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomes

Analysis of ancient DNA found that Scandinavia was settled by hunter-gatherers via a southern and a northern route, and reveals that agriculture was likely introduced by migrating agriculturalists. [more]
Salmonella enterica, the bacterium responsible for enteric fever, may be the long-debated cause of the 1545-1550 AD “cocoliztli” epidemic in Oaxaca, Mexico that heavily affected the native population.

Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identified

Salmonella enterica, the bacterium responsible for enteric fever, may be the long-debated cause of the 1545-1550 AD “cocoliztli” epidemic in Oaxaca, Mexico that heavily affected the native population. [more]
 
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